"Big Ears" is a public engagement training course, initiated by
Dr. Franziska Schroeder from the Sonic Arts Research Centre (SARC)
Queen ’s University Belfast

"Big Ears" was first funded by the AHRC's Collaborative Research Training Fund between 2011 - 2012.
In 2013 the training received funding through the Higher Education Academy (HEA).
Since its inception "Big Ears" has trained over 30 doctoral students, and over 90 children have partcipated in the final activity events.

The training was designed by Dr. Franziska Schroeder from the School of Creative Arts, Queen's University Belfast, and is facilitated by staff from the “Young at Art”, Northern Ireland's leading children's arts organisation.
"Big Ears" runs within the Belfast Childrens Festival and is tailored to doctoral students with a music /sound background, in particular for those with an interest in new technologies. 
Each year, "Big Ears" has made available several funded places for PhD students to travel from UK Higher Education institutions to SARC in order to receive training in public engagement.
The course delivers training in communication skills, public engagement and offers hands-on experiences for researchers in linking with a non-specialist audience.

Aims and Objectives of the course are:
• To provide innovative training in public engagement for doctoral students in the performing arts
• To create vital links between the University and a professional arts organisation with invaluable experience in public engagement
• To deliver stimulating ways of teaching communication skills
• To offer skills in designing, managing and planning a project involving a non-specialist public
• To provide hands-on experience in working and designing with a non-specialist public
• To provide opportunities for students to share their research with a wider public
• To provide a collective doctoral student experience

Big Ears 2011

Big Ears 2012

Big Ears 2013


Contact: Franziska Schroeder

f.schroeder@qub.ac.uk
School of Creative Arts
Queen's University Belfast

Supported by a Collaborative Research Training Award, AHRC 2011-2012: